Time Change Increases Car Accidents and Cyberloafing

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Jill Chadwick

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          It’s time to turn your clocks forward as a ritual observed in the United States for nearly 100 years happens this weekend.  And, what a difference one hour can make! Just ask sleep specialist Suzanne Stevens, MD, in the neurology department at The University of Kansas Health System. As people ‘spring forward’ this Sunday, she says be prepared for sleepy drivers on the road and employees spending more time surfing the net on Monday.  Dr. Steven’s says that’s because they lack the energy to stay focused on their driving and job. 

“We truly see an increase in traffic accidents during the week following the daylight savings time change in the spring,” Dr. Stevens said.  “People typically are getting by on 40 minutes less sleep and that is enough to throw your attention and schedule off.” 

            In the video, Dr. Stevens talks more about the impact of this time change on both children and adults, why it hits us so hard as well as tips for surviving and thriving this daylight savings change.