Hot Weather and Hot Cars Put Kids In Danger

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Jill Chadwick

News Director

Office: (913) 588-5013

Cell: (913) 223-3974

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jchadwick@kumc.edu

            The Midwest is getting its first taste of sweltering heat for the year. With the temperature expected to reach the mid 90’s across the region, Dr. Lee Norman, Chief Medical Officer at The University of Kansas Hospital, says it can take just a few minutes for the inside of a closed car to reach temperatures in excess of 110 degrees.   

             Eleven children have died nationwide so far in 2016, from being left too long in a hot car.  Since 1998, a total of 672 children have died of heatstroke according to experts who believe the number of deaths go under-reported. That’s one reason the State of Missouri is considering a law that would protect those who save kids in hot cars.     

             In the video, Dr. Norman explains the medical danger, precautions and what to do when a child or adult suffers heatstroke. Also, watch video of a thermometer left inside a hot car to see just how quickly the car heats up on relatively mild day with temperatures in the low to mid 80’s. The temperature started at 78 degrees just after the car was shut off and climbed to 102 within 27 minutes.