Frostbite Can Strike Faster Than You Think

Media Resources

Jill Chadwick

News Director

Office: (913) 588-5013

Cell: (913) 223-3974

Email

jchadwick@kumc.edu

            Many of us broke out the snow shovels after the recent winter storm, but some people make one simple mistake that could cause major problems: failing to properly insulate their bodies from the cold. When the temperature falls to single digits, it doesn’t take long for frostbite to affect feet, fingers, ears or any other parts of the body not  covered up.

            Dr. James Howard treats patients in the burn unit of The University of Kansas Hospital, which is where those with frostbite are usually seen. So far eight patients have been hospitalized for frostbite this season. In the video, Dr. Howard explains how quickly frostbite can hit, what symptoms to look for, how important it is to get fast treatment and the long term effects of frostbite. He also talks about the best way to prevent frostbite.

            The video also shows homeowner Jennifer Abbott shoveling her driveway. She talks about how she dresses for the job.

  Also on the video is Robert Atkins, a patient who was admitted to the hospital for frostbite on his feet, and a doctor examining him in his bed.